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Las Vegas museum hosts program on F1 and organized crime

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Las Vegas and the Mafia are almost synonymous for many reasons, thus inevitably Formula 1 and the Mob had their moments in 1981 and 1982 when Bernie Ecclestone took the sport to the Caesar Palace car park.

Next month, four decades later, F1 is back in Las Vegas with the Grand Prix on 18 November. It’s back with a huge bang as the USA embraces the sport like never before and one of the highlights is sure to be a walk down history lane.

During the build-up to the return to Vegas, the Mob Museum, the National Museum of Organized Crime and Law Enforcement, is celebrating the return of the Las Vegas Grand Prix with a public program about the history of auto racing and racketeers over the years in Sin City.

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The program, titled: “Racing and Racketeers: Motorsport and Organized Crime in Las Vegas” will feature two local experts racing historian Randy Cannon and retired casino executive Bill Weinberger. It is scheduled for 7 p.m. on Thursday, 26 October

Las Vegas GP F1

The event’s press release adds: “Fittingly, as the elite international racing circuit returns to Las Vegas for the first time in 40 years, this program will explore the history of auto racing in the entertainment capital of the world – and the Mob’s role in making it happen.

“Cannon and Weinberger will look back at the Stardust International Raceway in the 1960s and the Caesars Palace Grand Prix in the early 1980s. They also will discuss the ties between organized crime and past eras of Las Vegas racing glory.

“The hosts certainly are experts in this field. Cannon is the author of ‘Caesars Palace Grand Prix: Las Vegas, Organized Crime and Pinnacle of Motorsport‘ while Weinberger is a former president of Caesars Palace.”

The “Racing and Racketeers: Motorsport and Organized Crime in Las Vegas” program is free for Museum Members or with Museum admission and can be live-streamed by visiting the webpage here.