Malaysian Grand Prix: Hamilton too good as Mercedes dominate at Sepang

Formula One World Championship, Rd2, Malaysian Grand Prix, Race, Sepang, Malaysia, Sunday 30 March 2014.

Lewis Hamilton won the Malaysian Grand Prix with a pole-to-flag victory ahead of Nico Rosberg on Sunday in a first Mercedes one-two since they returned to Formula 1 as a works team in 2010 – the last time they did so as the F1 Silver Arrows was in 1955.

The 2008 Formula One World Champion easily pulled away from his rivals on a dry track, with a three-stop strategy, to win the race by 17.3 seconds, take his 23rd career victory, and finally break his Sepang bogey.

“Really grateful, thank you so much,” the Briton told his team over the radio after taking the chequered flag for his second win for Mercedes since he joined them last year, and his first points of the 2014 season.

Formula One World Championship, Rd2, Malaysian Grand Prix, Race, Sepang, Malaysia, Sunday 30 March 2014.

He added on the podium afterwards, “That was just incredible after such a difficult weekend and a long winter. I just feel so grateful, particularly after the tragedy three weeks [ago] and I would like to dedicate the win to the families [of Flight MH 370].”

“Today you are sweating before you even got in the car so you just have try to keep cool and keep your focus. But the team were absolutely spot on with all their instructions today so “big thanks” to them,” said the Briton.

Rosberg, who won the season opener in Australia two weeks ago, started in third place but slipped past quadruple world champion Sebastian Vettel on the first corner and was able to keep the Red Bull at bay, and stay at the top of the the drivers’ standings.

Formula One World Championship, Rd2, Malaysian Grand Prix, Race, Sepang, Malaysia, Sunday 30 March 2014.

“I got a great start today, it was tough but I took it from there. I was trying to chase Lewis but he was just too quick for me today,” said the German.

Vettel finished third, 7.2 seconds behind Rosberg, for his first points of the season, following an early retirement in Australia, as he struggled to make an impact on the Mercedes pair without the rain that helped his Qualifying bid on Saturday.

A month ago few would have bet a dime on Red Bull finishing a race, let alone finishing on the podium, but that is exactly what Vettel did as he chased the silver cars after an early skirmish with luckless teammate Daniel Ricciardo who looked strong for at least a top-four finish until it all went awry for him after a botched pitstop. More of that later…

Vettel reflected on the Sepang podium, “The start was not very good and I was quite surprised when I saw Nico on my right. I thought that I had a good start but Nico was there, it was quite tight, Daniel was coming as well and I lost a place. Fortunately I got it back and later I tried to get as close to Nico as I could, but then it was like he found another gear, and pulled away. At the end I was just trying to get the car home. There’s still a long way to go – the Mercedes cars are quick!”

Formula One World Championship, Rd2, Malaysian Grand Prix, Race, Sepang, Malaysia, Sunday 30 March 2014.

Ferrari’s Fernando Alonso secured his second fourth place finish of the season, after coming out ahead in a tight battle with Force India’s Nico Hulkenberg in the closing stages.

Alonso told reporters, “It was never an easy race, as I would expect, it was tough, and maybe we didn’t have the pace to follow the Mercedes or Red Bull. We had a different strategy and it was fun, but definitely we need to work a little bit on the performance. We want to battle with Red Bull and Mercedes. But on the other had we had zero technical problems all weekend – we just need better performance.”

Hulkenberg gets the Grand Prix 247 ‘Man of the Match’ for his efforts which continue to show up the ignorance of the big team bosses who appear to disregard his constant above par performances with midfield equipment.

Formula One World Championship, Rd2, Malaysian Grand Prix, Race, Sepang, Malaysia, Sunday 30 March 2014.

Hulkenberg said, “After the start, I was in a nice comfortable position so it was easier to manage the tyres and fuel which was good. Alonso was ‘eating me alive’ but I knew that there was no way to keep him at bay. I was expecting McLaren and more so with Williams that they would be all over me but we performed very well.”

“It’s been a really smooth transition [going back to Force India] better than I thought to be honest, it helps knowing people and I love the guys. They all look after me and every now and again I will try to give them points and it seems to work so far. The aim in Bahrain must to carry on and get some more points,” declared ‘The Hulk’.

McLaren’s Jenson Button was content to finish sixth, after starting tenth on the grid, “I think after Friday, sixth place was probably better than expected, I don’t think there were many cars slower than us, then but a lot of work was done. I had to really control where I could and couldn’t push so it was a really thinking race for me and mentally very tiring. It’s not where we want to finish though…we need some upgrades.”

Formula One World Championship, Rd2, Malaysian Grand Prix, Race, Sepang, Malaysia, Sunday 30 March 2014.

Team orders drama (which dominated headlines at the same race last year) re-emerged, this time at Williams as Felipe Massa repeatedly ignored calls from the team’s pit-wall to allow teammate Valtteri Bottas  through.

  • Williams team: “Felipe, Valtteri [Bottas] is faster than you. Can you let him through?”
  • Valtteri Bottas’ race engineer: “You’re faster than him [Massa], overtake him!”

Massa refused to yield and as a result the Williams duo crossed the line nose-to-tail in seventh and eighth respectively, the veteran Brazilian racer sending a clear message to his new team in the process.

Massa was unrepentant, ” I was just fighting to the end, that’s the way I wanted to do it and I will fight for my career and for what is right. I did nothing wrong because I was chasing Jenson Button and there was a chance of catching him. I don’t regret what I did. I tried to push in the direction that I believed was the right one and we both got points on the day. I have very good respect for the team and I believe that they respect me, and that is very important.”

Bottas gave his version, “I was approaching quicker than him. We should speak with the team, look at the data and see if I could have caught Jenson – I thought I could have. We need to learn from today for the future, we always have to keep learning.”

Formula One World Championship, Rd2, Malaysian Grand Prix, Race, Sepang, Malaysia, Sunday 30 March 2014.

McLaren’s Danish rookie Kevin Magnussen and Toro Rosso’s Russian newcomer Daniil Kvyat rounded out the top 10 of a race that suffered just a couple of light drops of rain, despite concerns about possible thunderstorms.

Magnussen again did his shares no harm with a strong performance, perhaps blighted by an early tangle with Raikkonen for which he was penalised, perhaps too harshly for the  offense committed, but he took it on the chin without complaints.

“I apologise to the team because I made a mistake in the first corner and it made the race a lot worse. I’m sorry about that and I will learn. Jenson did a brilliant job today – he started 10th and finished sixth. I started eighth and should have finished well from a better starting position. It was my mistake,” admitted Magnussen.

It was a big step forward for Lotus as Romain Grosjean finished 11th, despite niggles throughout the afternoon, but nevertheless making up for the retirement of teammate Pastor Maldonado.

Grosjean declared, “I think it was alright overall, the tyre degradation was hard to control, and it was tough [the] last few laps. It was good to see the chequered flag and a good reward for all the guys.”

Formula One World Championship, Rd2, Malaysian Grand Prix, Race, Sepang, Malaysia, Sunday 30 March 2014.

Kimi Raikkonen was victim of an early puncture, when he went wheel to wheel with Magnussen, after which he was out of contention. His reward for a tough afternoon in the trenches was 12th, as his return to Ferrari continues to be dogged by frustration.

After his Melbourne first lap debacle, Kamui Kobayashi signalled his return to the big stage with a feisty performance in his Caterham, finishing 13th and providing good entertainment as he battled doggedly in mid-pack, giving Raikkonen a run all the way to the finish line.

Ricciardo, who was disqualified in Australia (pending an appeal), missed out on points for the second race in a row after a disastrous third pit stop while  running fourth.

The Red Bull driver pulled away before his front left wheel was fully attached. This led to the somewhat comical sight of his mechanics sprinting down the pitlane to push him back, and fix the issue.

The Australian was then given a 10 second penalty for the unsafe release but his chances of points were already over after he shredded a tyre and damaged a wing shortly before the stewards’ decision. He retired soon after.

Formula One World Championship, Rd2, Malaysian Grand Prix, Race, Sepang, Malaysia, Sunday 30 March 2014.

Ricciardo said, “I am disappointed, it was looking like we could have a solid points finish and I was starting to mix it up at the front but at the last pit stop there were all the problems so the race ended pretty quickly for me.”

“Deep down I am really disappointed but there is a bit in me which is happy because I have come out how i wanted to in the first two races, I want to improve, but there are things to be pleased with.

“Because I am always smiling and happy a lot of people think I am too nice, but I am here to race and I want to race at the front and you will see a lot more of that,” concluded the Australian.

Final word to Mercedes Non-Executive Chairman Niki Lauda who punched the air as Hamilton crossed the finish line, “The team is my baby and I am very happy,” said Lauda. “It was a fantastic drive by Lewis and Nico and to get first and second was great. Two races, two wins, we can’t do any better.”

Lewis+Hamilton+F1+Grand+Prix+Malaysia+pn3NEjIK3yqx

“I am not surprised by the start though, because I have watched the team throughout the winter. We knew that the new car was better than last year’s and we have got a balanced car with a good engine so the next couple of races are going to be very exciting.”

“I am keeping my feet on the ground because things can change very quickly, so I will never get carried away. We will continue to improve the engine and the car to make sure we can just keep our noses ahead.” (Reuters-GP247)

Subbed by AJN.

Subbed by AJN.

Malaysian Grand Prix, Sepang International Circuit – Sunday, 20 March 2014

Pos No Driver Team Laps Time Grid Pts
1 44 Lewis Hamilton Mercedes 56 Winner 1 25
2 6 Nico Rosberg Mercedes 56 +17.3 secs 3 18
3 1 Sebastian Vettel Red Bull Racing-Renault 56 +24.5 secs 2 15
4 14 Fernando Alonso Ferrari 56 +35.9 secs 4 12
5 27 Nico Hulkenberg Force India-Mercedes 56 +47.1 secs 7 10
6 22 Jenson Button McLaren-Mercedes 56 +83.6 secs 10 8
7 19 Felipe Massa Williams-Mercedes 56 +85.0 secs 13 6
8 77 Valtteri Bottas Williams-Mercedes 56 +85.5 secs 18 4
9 20 Kevin Magnussen McLaren-Mercedes 55 +1 Lap 8 2
10 26 Daniil Kvyat STR-Renault 55 +1 Lap 11 1
11 8 Romain Grosjean Lotus-Renault 55 +1 Lap 15
12 7 Kimi Räikkönen Ferrari 55 +1 Lap 6
13 10 Kamui Kobayashi Caterham-Renault 55 +1 Lap 20
14 9 Marcus Ericsson Caterham-Renault 54 +2 Lap 22
15 4 Max Chilton Marussia-Ferrari 54 +2 Lap 21
Ret 3 Daniel Ricciardo Red Bull Racing-Renault 49 +7 Lap 5
Ret 21 Esteban Gutierrez Sauber-Ferrari 35 +21 Laps 12
Ret 99 Adrian Sutil Sauber-Ferrari 32 +24 Laps 17
Ret 25 Jean-Eric Vergne STR-Renault 18 +38 Laps 9
Ret 17 Jules Bianchi Marussia-Ferrari 8 +48 Laps 19
Ret 13 Pastor Maldonado Lotus-Renault 7 +49 Laps 16
Ret 11 Sergio Perez Force India-Mercedes 0 +56 laps 14

Note – Bottas qualified 15th but was subsequently penalised three grid places for impeding during qualifying.

Content on GrandPrix247.com by: staff & contributors, Reuters syndication, GMM service, Getty Images, Formula 1 teams, sponsors & organisations.

  • http://www.facebook.com/Bomoh1Malaysia Raja Bomoh Nujum VIP

    wah atok 1sttttt

  • Amos James

    Who was 11th and 12th? It was neck and neck over the line…

    Ugh report in progress. ..

  • Tamburello1994

    Felipe’s got some explaining to do.

    Someone give the Hulk a faster car please. Ferrari might be re-thinking that text message snub right about now.

  • http://bryanvcpalacio.weebly.com brianne

    gros and Kimi respectively… kimi wasnt able to pass

  • http://bryanvcpalacio.weebly.com brianne

    mighty race from lewis, untouchable is the word!

    poor daniel… welcome to the agony of being a red bull no 2

  • http://bryanvcpalacio.weebly.com brianne

    well he made a promise of not being a no 2 driver again, he is true to his word

  • Tamburello1994

    The people who sign his paycheck may not appreciate that. Promise or not.

    Back in the day Frank would have made sure that wouldn’t happen again.

  • http://www.facebook.com/Bomoh1Malaysia Raja Bomoh Nujum VIP

    bodoh

  • Amos James

    Massa has always acted a bit like a spoilt child, but at least he used to follow orders most of the time at Ferrari.

    It Felt like deja vu, tho. “Felipe, Fernando/Valteri is faster than you.”

    Poor guy. Still, he gets to race f1, so.maybe he needs to learn his place.

  • Tamburello1994

    Frank will get his head right, guaranteed.

  • Amos James

    Grosjean ahead of kimi? Sounds familiar. Well, good on Lotus for starting to show some potential. Now that it is reliable, hopefully they tune some more speed into it.

    I enjoyed seeing kobayashi battling with both if them, too.

  • Amos James

    I’d hate to have to face sir Frank and Patrick Head…. I heard that even mansell backed down pretty quick when they had to correct him.

  • http://bryanvcpalacio.weebly.com brianne

    well to be honest i didnt quite understand why williams would not want them to race one another in only the 2nd race, regardless of who’s faster or not.

  • http://bryanvcpalacio.weebly.com brianne

    ha?

  • Amos James

    Bodoh means ‘stupid’ in Malay.

    Looks like Raja doesn’t agree with you.

  • farizY

    Let me rephrase that for you; mighty race from Mercedes engineers, who are currently successful at turning the melodramatic Lewis; who last year said starting from the front and dominating is boring, but did it himself anyways; to a race winner. I mean, who would not, right? given the proper equipment, anybody would. 😉

  • farizY

    Quite early though for team orders, but then again, they are allowed to.

  • farizY

    Syabas Tok!

  • Tamburello1994

    No, I totally I agree with you – Not sure what the team was thinking and Claire was doing a serious tap-dance in her interview.

    What it could mean is Williams is trying to front Bottas and Massa isn’t part of the long term plan. (Mark Webber)

  • bobmendon

    Yawn…Hamilton pole and gone and we don’t see him to the end. Boring! Isn’t that what they said about Vettel? :p

  • bobmendon

    The race is hardly over and conspiracy wing-nuts are at again. I’m not going to bother to try and convince them otherwise because there’s no way to compete with the voices in their heads taking instructions from Mars through their tinfoil hats.

  • Amos James

    Hahahahahah it’s crazy bob again! How’s prison, mate?

  • Amos James

    Bob down. Bob for apples. Bob Lob Law.

    Bob the bigot strikes again.

  • http://www.facebook.com/Bomoh1Malaysia Raja Bomoh Nujum VIP

    Damn you’re good…..how’s my english…..been doing shamanism for decades, time to learn english this time by watching Formula One

  • http://bryanvcpalacio.weebly.com brianne

    vettel won too many races last year in succession, thats why the fans thought it was boring… hamilton won just once(yet).

    im surprised you didnt know that when everyone else have

  • http://bryanvcpalacio.weebly.com brianne

    for one, mercedes engineers are not driving so you can save your sarcasm somewhere else.

    im not a lewis fan and I absolutely hate his hollywood drama but i know when I see a good drive and a deserving winner. but of course haters will always be haters with the dumbest of reasons so hats off to you for the effort :)

  • http://bryanvcpalacio.weebly.com brianne

    massa may not be in F1 for a longer time so your theory maybe right but then again, as much as bottas goes, its too early to pick your “prefered driver” and even though massa will never be the same 2008 person, he can still bring something to williams if treated equally

  • Nobody

    Nasty Bob making a remark while popping out his tongue :)

  • LePaul

    Lol and when Ferrari did it it was “OH NOES, CHEATERZ!!!” despite Massa not having a chance of winning even the team mate battle, let alone the championship.. Whereas now, he could easily win vs Bottas in the long run..

  • farizY

    Come on,give the engineers some credit, afterall, without the hardware, how could Lewis got up there.
    Nope,never said you were a fan, no need to explain that to me. I guess that settles it then, a driver starts from pole and go on to dominate the race, is a deserving winner.
    The part I don’t like about Lewis is that he was bitchin’ that winning from the front and dominating by miles is boring,no excitement, but he does it as well,so isn’t that hypocrisy? Like I said, anybody would do it given the proper machine (not denying that Lewis is talented,but definitely a hypocrite).

  • Hawk

    It was all about JB ahead. Massa had miserably failed to reel him in. But then Williams must have gotten greedy. They wanted more. And were flattered when told that their car is second to Merc.

  • BS

    They gave bob a new shirt…no more turtleneck.

  • BS

    You just don’t like LH cause he’s black…you’re racist bob.

  • http://bryanvcpalacio.weebly.com brianne

    typical troll comment. no sense, no information at all, joking as if it was funny but instead crappy… yeah troll bob, give us some more!

  • Severn

    Hamilton after Vettel won at Singapore last year –
    “I tried to imagine what it would be like if I was
    winning races the way he is winning races. Me, I don’t want to be able to be
    that far ahead, I want to be able to fight with him or whoever.”

    So my sympathies to poor Lewis, who spent the last several years crying about how good Seb’s car was and now has a car much more dominant than any which Vettel ever drove.

  • Robb

    I was initially worried that fuel saving would dominate the season but thankfully this appears not to be the case. Had they been driving to deltas to save fuel, Nico and Lewis should have been right together on track for the whole race. The seventeen second gap would appear to indicate that it was speed that ultimately determined the result, rather than fuel saving. In fact I didn’t hear any talk of fuel saving by any of the teams. Yay!

  • Severn

    You only like LH because he’s brown .. you’re a racist BS.

  • Severn

    Teams were driving to deltas to save tyres last season. This did not result in every teams drivers being right together on track.

  • Severn

    “mercedes engineers are not driving”

    Newey was not driving for the past four years,

  • LePaul

    Lol more dominant than any which Vettel ever drove? Although I dislike Hamilton, Merc is hardly more dominant than RB last year for instance. They didn’t have a car that dominated more than Merc currently only 3 years, 1 of these being the year when Brawn won

  • Dave Bates

    Graphics, fuel % used by each car, is this designed to help the viewing public ! or to confuse even more ? is this peak consumpion or overaul consumption ? I,m sort of guessing that these percentages are a measurement of the amount left in the tank. But why the differences in amounts used. As a gestimate around 5-6 % difference between cars. I thought the idea of fuel flow regulation was to keep fuel used equal for all cars, also for safety reasons. I can understand small variations due to track position clean air versus racing, but this just serves to confuse. I have studied so many tectnical websites on the pro,s & cons of using peak consumption flow regulation, as opposed to overaul consumption, but rather sit on the fence, i have used logic to come down on the side of ” just get rid of it ! difficult to police, and certainly confusing for average race fans. These nifty graphics % of fuel used would then serve some kind of purpose on teams fuel stratagies. Personally i would love to watch the teams who blast fuel through their engines, 1500 bhp, 15000rpm, melting pistons & turbos, excessive speed differences between the other teams. we could watch the fuel used meter reach 100% by lap 15. this would be great team stratagy for race fans who enjoy watching engines explode. regards DB

  • Amos James

    It’s really good. English isn’t easy to learn because it has so many roots (latin, greek, Norse, celtic etc). I’d say your English is excellent

  • Dave Bates

    Or 0.5% peak flow calibration differences between mercs ? Who knows eh !

  • Amos James

    Anyone heard from Stoner?

  • Tamburello1994

    When Ferrari did it Felipe complied with the teams request was my point.

  • LePaul

    From what I gathered, it is the total consumption of fuel. They have 100kg at the start and if someone’s consumption is 22% on lap 15, that means they used 22kgs of the fuel during the first 15 laps. I don’t find it confusing. Total fuel used must not exceed 100kg per race, whilst the fuel flow mustn’t exceed 100 kg/h. Anyone can use less total fuel, but they won’t go as fast if they use less. Someone could use less in the first 2 stints and use more fuel in the last one, to have a performance advantage in the last stint compared to those who have used more fuel throughout the first 2 stints and are saving fuel in the last one.

  • nakagoli

    What has Stoner got to do with it?

  • LePaul

    Well he had no other choice really. I like the guy, but no one can deny the fact that he hasn’t been the same since the crash. Ferrari kept him out of pity, imho, so if he defied team orders, that’d be gone. I do wish he won that championship in ’08, but c’est la vi, Alonso was even more unlucky a couple of years, but he kept fighting. Massa did have a few good races and qualifyings since the crash, but it wasn’t even nearly often enough that the points he brought to the table mattered enough for Ferrari to keep him even if he defied team orders. So he had no choice back then if he wanted to remain in the team.

  • Hugo Lafreniere

    Impressive drive by Vettel, I gotta admit. The way they came back from those awful pre-season tests is nothing short of epic.

  • Tamburello1994

    He had a choice – he made it – and to his credit, he’s not backing down from it. All of what you said is true. I just think it shows a bit of disrespect for the the people who sign your paycheck when you don’t listen to them. Its not Williams’s fault that Massa had to ‘play a Barrichello’ at Ferrari. Do I think it was fair to Felipe to be asked to move over when Bottas was applying light pressure at best? – No, But F1 isn’t about fair and when the team issues instructions I think it’s in the interest of the entire team for them to be followed. Williams had their reasons, and at the end of the day the car is a “Williams”, not a “Massa”.

  • Hugo Lafreniere

    “Bottas is faster than you”

    Except, he really wasn’t. Otherwise, he’d have been all over Massa. Which he wasn’t.

    I read on some other site that WIlliams’ plan was to have Bottas pass Massa, try to pass Button, and if that didn’t work, have Bottas move over and let Massa by again.

    Since Massa was not close enough to Button to pass him, Bottas would’ve had to be a HELL of a lot faster than Massa to catch Button, let alone pass him.

    So unless Massa slammed on the brakes, Bottas was never gonna pass. And IF Bottas was faster, and then caught up to Jenson without being able to pass, he would’ve had to slam on the brakes even harder to let Massa by again. What kind of artificial suck-ass spectacle would that have been?

    I don’t have a problem with the “don’t attack your teammate” orders. They are somewhat easy to justify. But “let your teammate by” orders” When said teammate is losing th world title at the last race, sure. In race #2,

  • LePaul

    I was talking about not having a choice when he was at Ferrari – well one always has a choice, but if he chose to ignore the orders then, he would lose the ride. I do agree with the rest of what you said, though 😉

  • Tamburello1994

    Right. No choice at Ferrari – I got it. So why is it different for Williams? Don’t you think they will threaten him with the same dire consequences if he disobeys again?

  • Dave Bates

    I understand your point, however the flip side is that this rule doesn,t reward engines that are more economical. Williams used around 91 or so kilograms for the race & of if the flow rates were left up to teams, then williams could have used the permitted amount of 100kgs & had a better advantage due to its more economic nature. I can understand the technical pros & cons of flow restriction about 50/50, but i don,t think political correctness & nanny state rules should apply to F1. Sorry but i have fallen to one side of the fence, & look forward to the findings. Red Bull are not my favourite team, but their vast technical expertise in wanting flow restriction binned, is good enough technical reason for me too. regards DB

  • LePaul

    Well atm Massa is the best they can get at Wiliams. Bottas is fast, true, but also highly inexperienced. Thus they are much less likely to issue – and follow up with – such a threat.
    Ferrari, on the other hand, despite being far from their top form in recent years, could still get a number of drivers that were better than Massa. I was quite frankly shocked that they kept Massa as long as they did as he under-delivered. It is understandable, after the championship being lost in the last corner and after the accident, of course.. But for a top team, it is not acceptable.

  • Tamburello1994

    @ Hugo Lafreniere

    Even though your comment is for some reason, under review, I can read it and I agree – Good points.

  • LePaul

    It does reward the engines that are more economical. The drivers use ‘lift & coast’ tactics to save fuel. The engines that are more economical enable drivers to be able to push full throttle till the breaking point. Williams could have used 100% of their fuel – if they wanted. From what I read, both of the drivers were told to back off towards the end due to overheating problems on both cars. So that might be the reason they didn’t use more fuel. Tyre degradation could also be the reason they didn’t use more fuel.
    What you’d get if you removed the fuel flow limit is very fast acceleration out of the corners and more lifting & coasting used by the drivers. It would, obviously, benefit the lap time, but it would also mean overtaking on straights was made even harder.

  • Dave Bates

    I totally agree the back offs are maybe down to heat related problems, but the lift & coast tactics to save fuel isn,t a factor because they finished the race with plenty to spare.

  • Paul

    Word salad.

  • Tamburello1994

    I can see your logic.

    …….Would explain Claire’s tap dance around the question of Massa ignoring the order in her post race presser. Frank would have gotten in someones face, whereas Claire was being a diplomat. Gonna be a lonely existence for Felipe if he goes rouge this early. Just don’t think that’s an effective winning strategy long term – will be interesting for us fans to watch play out now that, at least early on – ‘Fire and Ice’ appears to be a dud.

  • LePaul

    I completely agree :)

  • Tamburello1994

    Don’t be a baby.

  • LePaul

    Yes, however if the engine hadn’t been as economical, they would have had to resort to these tactics and thus lose lap time. Perhaps they actually were using that tactic early on and saved a lot of fuel and couldn’t use it in the end due to overheating.. No one but them can know for sure. I wasn’t paying much attention to the lights flashing that indicate automated fuel saving, but that is also something that the more economical cars can benefit from – less automated fuel saving (something they configure pre-race, but it’s hard to imagine they don’t know how much fuel they’d be using per lap).

    All in all, economical cars will have an advantage, especially in the tracks that are more fuel-demanding. I also reckon they could start with less fuel, if they think they don’t need 100 kgs to finish the race, so there’s another benefit (being lighter from the get-go).

  • Tamburello1994

    With these sound challenged PU’s – it will take some getting use to being able to hear the drivers so clearly in the two-way radio transmissions. Looking for positives.

  • Dave Bates

    Maybe, maybe, maybe, but for now i will trust the expert technical talents that make up Red Bull, as mentioned ( not my favourite team ) and i don,t think for 1 minute they will win this appeal.but i do go along & understand their point view. There are far too many sheeple around who just accept rules as if set in stone & although all teams signed up for the fuel flow route, they did so believing they would be 100% accurate. I cannot believe there are so many race fans who truly believe that the more restrictions in place is for the better of racing. Too many lawyers, beauracrats, financiers, & saving the planet do not mix together with racing. I wish you well with your views & respect your opinions, but please include them in your own comments on the article. Tchau.

  • LePaul

    Sorry, I wasn’t applying I like the restrictions, I share your view that the less rules the better (would truly be a case of who can come up with the most innovative things, although costs would also skyrocket), but alas rules are such that things can be transferred back to the road cars. We might not like the rules, but they are what they are 😉

  • Dave Bates

    I agree the rules are the rules, but for the love of the sport we do not have to blindly follow the FIA stance. Formula 1 is primarily a sport, its about motor racing & not to be turned into a media show that is controlled by the technocrats. The control of the sport has passed to the rulemakers. & yet the majority of f1 fans keep harping on about how racing ” used to be ! I was a teenager in the 60,s and my favourite inovators Colin Chapman, Bruce McLaren, etc. The FIA has a very important role to play, and over the years have done their utmost to make it both safe & supply a level field to play on. Free speech for the moment is still an option, however when someone actually has the balls to appeal & question the ethics of FIA, the sheeple are keen to follow the rulemakers. I enjoy pure racing & comment on issues because i am passionate for the future of racing. The inovators are strangled by the rulemakers, they now say that cars racing at differing speeds is a safety issue ! yet the years we all dream of had cars that had a different amount of wheels, suction fans & cushions for ground effect, turbos alongside norm. Asp, inovative body styling & wings, drivers passing out due to excess ” G,s ” we have a nanny state health & safety control freaks at the helm. & most people are happy to tag along and blindly agree. My original post was that i would prefer the teams & drivers t dictate pace & the FIA to control the amount, & maybe just maybe it will be race on ! Sorry but this is my view, even though rules are rules nobody needs a sport where dodgy sensors appear more important than the sport itself. Get rid of them i say.

  • http://bryanvcpalacio.weebly.com brianne

    have a party with this farizy guy… people who cant understand a simple statement.

  • BS

    Seb called…he said you could take you tongue out of his axxhole now.

  • Hawk

    you are stupid. Lewis has not come out to say that this race was any less boring than last year’s RB dominant races

  • Amos James

    I thought he/she might like to troll a bit and talk about how terribly alonso did and how kimi was star of the race.

    I enjoy feeding the trolls but he/she seems to quietened down, lately.

    I secretly miss him/her

  • Hawk

    MALAYSIA 2013
    Vettel. 1:38:57
    Lewis. 1:39:09

    MALAYSIA 2014
    Lewis. 1:40:26
    Vettel. 1:40:50

    No. of pitstops 3
    Variance. 1-2%