Fuelgate has Sepang paddock buzzing with speculation

Formula One World Championship, Rd2, Malaysian Grand Prix, Preparations, Sepang, Malaysia, Thursday 27 March 2014.

The Sepang paddock is buzzing with speculation regarding Red Bull’s appeal against their disqualification from second place at the Australian grand Prix,and their action plan ahead of the Malaysian Grand Prix weekend.

Many are wondering if the world champion team risk an even heavier sanction by ignoring the new FIA-supplied fuel flow sensor.

Ricciardo, who lost his second place in Melbourne, said: “I trust the team to make the right decisions.”

And Sebastian Vettel also backed Red Bull to do the right thing for the team, “Of course we are always trying to exploit everything to the limit – but always within the rules.”

But Ferrari driver Fernando Alonso indicated that he cannot understand Red Bull boss Christian Horner’s claim that the accuracy of sensors will be the difference between success and failure.

“When it comes to incorrect measurements, we are talking about numbers after the decimel point,” said the Ferrari driver. “Nobody will win or lose a race [because of fuel flow],” he added. (GMM)

Subbed by AJN.

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  • RBC

    More Red Bull$#!t. “Of course we are always trying to exploit everything to the limit – but always within the rules.” But you BROKE the rules, again, and called in the lawyers.

  • bobmendon

    More Red Bull hating. You are wrong on so many levels. They did not break a “rule” as they only ignored a steward’s directive. Please tell us when they broke the rules before. I don’t recall them being punished by the FIA.

  • Dave Bates

    I,m not a Red Bull fan, but on this occasion the red bull not only has wings, but also sports a very noble set of balls ! I do not yet understand the reasoning behind the other teams compliancy to this flawed flow sensor and ask the question ” if the device is well known to suppy different readings from ” session / session on the same car, and differs between readings on all cars during the race, then how can this flow sensor be classed as homologated ? Surely if the FIA has homologated this device it should be 100% the same for all cars. If the FIA instructs Red Bull to alter this device during the race it would no longer have homologation status. The FIA are not a democratic organisation, so therefore do not expect Red Bull to win their case, however i would expect a fair amount of egg on the faces of FIA. Please FIA swallow some pride, consign this device to the wheelie bin where it belongs, & wait another few years until sensors can be supplied with ” unquestionable ” accuracy. If the sensor cannot be proven 100% then why should sane fans believe in the race results 100% ? 100kgs of fuel per car from start / finish and allow the teams to decide how to consume this amount. Regards DB.

  • BS

    Oh, bob…you and Severn are so adorable!

  • RBC

    They lost the 2nd place in Melbourne, that’s a good example…

  • RBC

    You don’t understand the reason for the 100kg/hr limit. It stops them having hugely powerful engines costing millions to develop and make. Like the RPM limit, it is another way to help create a road relevant racing engine.

  • Dave Bates

    Would they reach the finishing line with powerfull engines such as the ones you are speaking of, on only 100kgs of fuel ? regards DB

  • RBC

    Yes of course. They HAVE powerful engines. 15,000 RPM when most road cars are at 6,000 RPM. 100kg/hr of fuel at the MAXIMUM is a HUGE amount. It is just that F1 engines COULD be at 22,000 RPM and 130kg/hr of fuel. But those extra small increments in performance cost huge amounts of money to create. There are LOTS of regulations about the engine to stop them being the absolute peak of performance. The fuel flow limit is just one of many rules about the engine.

    And you seem to think that they run at 100kg/hr of fuel all the time. That is false. This is just during maximum acceleration. In fact they ran at 30% of maximum performance in Melbourne for a lot of the time to save fuel to make it to the end. Grosjean said this. So even now if they ran at 100% they would not make it to the end of the race.

    I think you need to go away and read up on this issue and learn what is really going on. The fuel sensors that Red Bull use to determine their fuel flow are massively open to manipulation by the teams, allowing Red Bull to claim they are only using 100kg/hr of fuel when they could be using a lot more. That is why the FIA introduced this sensor in the first place. The OTHER system to measure fuel flow is ALSO unreliable. It’s just that Red Bull believe it is not, as this is to their advantage.

  • farizY

    Did Redbull bullied you back in school? Lol

  • farizY

    Did redbull bullied you and RBC back in school? LOL.

  • BS

    I love redbull….mixed with my Jäger!

  • farizY

    Very explosive indeed.

  • Dave Bates

    Given amount of fuel = a given amount of energy

  • RBC

    No they just cheated in F1 for 4 years. Nothing important.

  • RBC

    You don’t get it so no point explaining it to you. Given amount of fuel is one part of a much more complex equation, just forget it and go moan about the FIA etc…

  • Dave Bates

    I have no interest why you ” skipped school ” & of course the algibraic equations are very complex ! but the basics are 1st grade. Fuel is constant, distance is constant , speed is of course the variable ? More agressive speed = more fuel & since re- fueling is not allowed the distance figure changes. Please do not bore me with a reply.
    “If we don’t [get synchronised readings] we will find ourselves in an awkward situation, but one we will try to work with the FIA on, but we will find ourselves in the same dilemma as Melbourne,” Horner said.

    “We need a better way of measuring and monitoring the fuel flow, or say you get rid of it and you have 100kg for the race and that’s it.

    “Personally, I think it would be easier to get rid of it.” UNQUOTE.

  • Dave Bates

    boss Christian Horner has suggested that the easiest way to ensure that all teams are not caught out by a drifting sensor is to eliminate the fuel-flow rate all together. Some fans have been asking the same question. If the teams only have 100kgs of fuel onboard, then what does it matter how quickly or slowly the teams use it? AUTOSPORT has the call:

    “We need a better way of measuring and monitoring the fuel – or get rid of it totally and say you have 100kg, that is your lot,” he said.

    “That would be the easiest for the FIA and the teams because the fuel flow restriction would only be qualifying, as you could not go to stupid revs in the race because you have that [100kg] limitation of fuel.”

  • RBC

    Yeah and read what the FIA head of power train said about unrestricted fuel flow, 1,500 BHP engines, closing speeds and high speed crashes. He basically said that Horner’s idea could easily kill people on track.

    “If you have no fuel flow limit, the fastest thing is to use a huge boost at the beginning of the straight and then lift off,” said Fabrice Lom the FIA’s head of powertrain.

    “There will be huge and very dangerous differences of speed [between cars] on the same lap, with a driving style that is not really F1.”

    As for your maths, speed is variable in a race, but maximum power is the issue with fuel flow, not average power over a race, which is fixed by the amount of fuel and the ERS restrictions. You keep confusing the two issues.

  • Dave Bates

    Post your mind blowing remarks to Red Bull, i feel sure they have overlooked your special kind of logic.

  • RBC

    Actually the WHOLE of the F1 paddock and the FIA have said the same thing. Why don’t you call Red Bull and tell them how smart you are and get a job there and shut up on this forum.

  • Amos James

    You probably can’t recall where you left your soiled pants, either. Ugh… Please bobmental, u r embarrassing yourself.