Hembery: We are expecting a journey into the unknown with the new 2014 cars

Paul Hembery is braced for a season of discovery in 2014

Paul Hembery is braced for a season of discovery in 2014

The days where grand prix races are spiced-up by deliberately heavily-degrading Pirelli tyres could be over, as the Italian manufacturer seeks to create less headlines in 2014 which Paul Hembery has described as a journey into the unknown.

Since the tyre-exploding crisis earlier this season, and the mid-year shift from steel to Kevlar-belted tyres, Pirelli has also been taking more conservative compound choices to the races.

Very recently, it has culminated in less exiting grands prix, and runaway championship leader Sebastian Vettel’s tight grip on the second half of the season.

For 2014, despite the radical engine rules shift, little will change on the tyre front.

In a short space of time Pirelli have become an integral part of F1

In a short space of time Pirelli have become an integral part of F1

“We will take a very conservative strategy,” Pirelli boss Paul Hembery told Auto Motor und Sport.
“We will take the worst-case simulation as the basis for the development of the tyre structure.”

Hembery argues that Pirelli has been pushed in that direction by the teams, who are not overly willing to help with tyre development for 2014.

Indeed, even the attempt to test with a representative car – Mercedes‘ current W04 – ended spectacularly badly for both the German team and Formula 1′s tyre supplier.

Now, Pirelli is having to conduct 1000 kilometre tests with two-year old cars, such as the one with Red Bull in Barcelona recently.

“It went well, as far as we can tell,” said Hembery. “The car is three seconds faster than our Lotus test car. But we are still expecting a journey into the unknown with the new 2014 cars.”

Pirelli men at work

Pirelli men at work

Even a post-race test in Brazil after the 2013 season finale has now been cancelled.

“It (the tyre development situation) is because of the paranoia of the teams,” said Hembery. “What we need in order to do our job, unfortunately doesn’t fit with what the teams want. And nobody is coming up with a solution.”

There is also uncertainty about Pirelli’s longer-term future in F1.

The FIA has finally rubber-stamped the marque’s presence on the grid beyond 2013, but a statement said that is just a “transition period” because Bernie Ecclestone and the teams had already agreed deals with Pirelli.

“Pirelli has five year agreements signed with Ecclestone and the teams and expects that these [will be] respected,” said La Gazzetta dello Sport’s Andrea Cremonesi. (GMM)

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